Review Article

Long-term effects of childhood speech and language disorders: A scoping review

Danette Langbecker, Centaine L. Snoswell, Anthony C. Smith, Jedidja Verboom, Liam J. Caffery
South African Journal of Childhood Education | Vol 10, No 1 | a801 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajce.v10i1.801 | © 2020 Danette Langbecker, Centaine L. Snoswell, Anthony C. Smith, Jedidja Verboom, Liam J. Caffery | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 31 July 2019 | Published: 25 September 2020

About the author(s)

Danette Langbecker, Centre for Online Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Centaine L. Snoswell, Centre for Online Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Anthony C. Smith, Centre for Online Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Jedidja Verboom, Centre for Online Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
Liam J. Caffery, Centre for Online Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

Abstract

Background: Speech and language disorders in childhood have the potential to affect every aspect of a child’s day-to-day life and can potentially have negative long-term impacts.

Aim: This scoping review seeks to collate the existing evidence to identify the long-term effects of childhood speech and language disorders.

Methods: A systematic search of speechBITE, ERIC (Education Resources Information Center), Linguistics and Language Behaviour Abstracts, PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SocINDEX and the Cochrane Library was conducted. Peer-reviewed English language publications reporting on the long-term (2+-year) outcomes of individuals with a childhood history of speech or language disorders were included. Data were extracted and the study quality assessed using a modified Newcastle–Ottawa scale.

Results: Fifty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies reported mixed results, the most common of which were suboptimal mental health, social and academic outcomes for persons with a history of speech or language disorders. We found an association between childhood speech or language disorders and psychiatric disability, behavioural problems, lower socio-economic status, relationship and living difficulties, and lower academic achievement compared to the general population.

Conclusion: Individuals with a history of childhood speech or language disorders may experience long-term difficulties in mental health, social well-being and academic outcomes.


Keywords

speech and language; mental health; behaviour; psychosocial; quality of life; scoping review

Metrics

Total abstract views: 4546
Total article views: 3310

 

Crossref Citations

1. Speech-language disorder severity, academic success, and socioemotional functioning among multilingual and English children in the United States: The National Survey of Children’s Health
Matthew E. Foster, Ai Leen Choo, Sara A. Smith
Frontiers in Psychology  vol: 14  year: 2023  
doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1096145